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Oral-Systemic Health

 

checkTotal Health

Oral health can offer clues about overall health. Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.

checkGum Disease

Periodontal (gum) disease is a leading cause of tooth loss and may be associated with other chronic diseases, including diabetes and heart disease. Information provided by The American Academy of Periodontology.

checkHeart Health

The mission of American Heart Association is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke.  What role does oral health care play in the prevention of heart disease.

checkStroke

Dental infections have also been associated with stroke. The National Stroke Association is committed to providing educational tools and resources for you, your patients and your community.

checkDiabetes

Research shows that there is an increased prevalence of gum disease among those with diabetes, adding serious gum disease to the list of other complications associated with diabetes.

checkOral Cancer

Understanding Oral Cancer
Historically the death rate associated with this cancer is particularly high not because it is hard to discover or diagnose, but due to oral cancer being routinely discovered late in its development. Get the facts from the Oral Cancer Foundation as to the relevant connection between to oral cancer and alcohol, tobacco and human papilloma virus. The role of the dental professional is essential for early detection, screening and treatment.

checkTobacco Cessation

Find out how health care providers can help patients quit smoking and how the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids is planning for a future free of the death and disease caused by tobacco.

checkRespiratory Disease

Millions of Americans have difficulty breathing, and chronic lung problems are the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States. Research now indicates that people who are concerned with their respiratory health should pay attention to gum disease. Healthy gums may lead to healthy lungs, while poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease may lead to respiratory disease.

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checkHIV/AIDS

People with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), are at special risk for oral health problems. See the most common oral problems linked to HIV, what they look like, where in the mouth they occur and how they are treated.

checkOsteoporosis

Osteoporosis and tooth loss are health concerns that affect many older men and women. Research suggests a link between osteoporosis and bone loss in the jaw. Medicines that help strengthen bones have been associated with the rare but serious condition osteonecrosis.

checkDevelopmental Disabilities

Developmental disabilities such as autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, and intellectual disability are present during childhood or adolescence and last a lifetime. People with disabilities often need extra help to achieve and maintain health. Practical oral care is essential for dental professionals to aid people with developmental disabilities.
Everyday care of someone with a developmental disability requires patience and skill. Help caregivers show patients how to help someone brush, floss, and have a healthy mouth.

checkSleep Disorders

Sleep disorders are problems with sleeping. These include: Trouble falling or staying asleep, Falling asleep at the wrong times, Too much sleep, Abnormal behaviors during sleep.  Learn more.

 

checkOrofacial Myofunctional Disorders

Orofacial myology is a specialized professional discipline that evaluates and treats a variety of oral and facial (orofacial) muscle (myo-) postural and functional disorders and habit patterns that may disrupt normal dental development and also create cosmetic problems.  Learn more about orofacial myofunctional disorders.